Bullet Supremacy

Eryn Kwon, Doctoral Candidate; 
Charm Kwon, MD

    When a bullet impacts its target, the majority of the fragments generated spatter forward in the direction of the bullet. However, there is also a smaller portion of fragmentation at the entrance site, travelling back towards the shooter. This retrograde spatter is called backspatter. Due to its reverse-directionality, backspatter can provide important information to solve crimes that cannot be found in normal forward spatter. This still shot of a bullet penetrating a bone simulant captures both the forward and backspatter being generated by a 9 mm full metal jacket bullet, which has a muzzle speed of 350 metres-per-second.

 

When a bullet impacts its target, the majority of the fragments generated spatter forward in the direction of the bullet. However, there is also a smaller portion of fragmentation at the entrance site, travelling back towards the shooter. This retrograde spatter is called backspatter. Due to its reverse-directionality, backspatter can provide important information to solve crimes that cannot be found in normal forward spatter. This still shot of a bullet penetrating a bone simulant captures both the forward and backspatter being generated by a 9 mm full metal jacket bullet, which has a muzzle speed of 350 metres-per-second.