Cartilage Matrix Ripples

Mieke Nickien, Doctoral Candidate;

Ashvin Thambyah, PhD;

Neil Broom, PhD

 

      
  
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     Our Experimental Tissue Mechanics Laboratory is studying how cartilage responds to compressive loads relating to joint function. Using a custom designed indenter that contains a central relieft channel it is possible to greatly enchance visualisation of the patterns of micro-level deformation induced by the compressive loading.  The image shows the intersecting pattern of oblique shear bands that form in the healthy cartilage matrix, the cells appearing to 'float' in this micro-ocean of complex formation.

 

Our Experimental Tissue Mechanics Laboratory is studying how cartilage responds to compressive loads relating to joint function. Using a custom designed indenter that contains a central relieft channel it is possible to greatly enchance visualisation of the patterns of micro-level deformation induced by the compressive loading.

The image shows the intersecting pattern of oblique shear bands that form in the healthy cartilage matrix, the cells appearing to 'float' in this micro-ocean of complex formation.