Kaleidoscope, 3D!

Amir HajiRassouliha, Doctoral Candidate;

Anna-Lena Schell, Masters student;

Sam Richardson, Doctoral Candidate

      
  
 
  
    
  
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 This image combines one of our favourite childhood toys with cutting-edge science; a kaleidoscopic view from a stereoscopic camera.  The mechanical properties of soft tissues such as skin convey much information about our health. Stereoscopic (3D) cameras can be used to determine the mechanical properties of soft tissues. We use the recordings further, to develop mathematical models of the deformation of biological tissues.

 

This image combines one of our favourite childhood toys with cutting-edge science; a kaleidoscopic view from a stereoscopic camera.

The mechanical properties of soft tissues such as skin convey much information about our health. Stereoscopic (3D) cameras can be used to determine the mechanical properties of soft tissues. We use the recordings further, to develop mathematical models of the deformation of biological tissues.