Pelvis Personas

Ju Zhang, PhD

      
  
 
  
    
  
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   This work demonstrates the interesting variations found in our bodies and explores the ways in which one can interpret medical images.  Routinely used by radiologists to assess bone health, medical computed tomography (CT) scans also provide much for the imagination, as shown by these images of the pelvis. Variations in the shape of the sacrum bone and patient position produce a plethora of interpretations in the eye of the viewer.  One reading of what emerges from deep within the body are faces, their expressions ranging from grotesque horror to cartoonish joy.   Many thanks to the Jacqui Hislop-Jambrich and the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine for providing these images for our research.

 

This work demonstrates the interesting variations found in our bodies and explores the ways in which one can interpret medical images.

Routinely used by radiologists to assess bone health, medical computed tomography (CT) scans also provide much for the imagination, as shown by these images of the pelvis. Variations in the shape of the sacrum bone and patient position produce a plethora of interpretations in the eye of the viewer.

One reading of what emerges from deep within the body are faces, their expressions ranging from grotesque horror to cartoonish joy.

Many thanks to the Jacqui Hislop-Jambrich and the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine for providing these images for our research.