It's Hammer Time

Eryn Kwon, Doctoral Candidate;
Charm Kwon, MD

    When a violent crime happens, forensic scientists need to deduce the causal criminal event from the evidence. To stand the test in a court of law, the inverse calculation requires rigorous experimentation and simulation. This image of a hammer impacting a bloody surface is part of a high speed video, filmed at 4000 frames-per-second. The dynamic movement and behaviour of the blood observed from the video will allow forensic scientists to understand the resulting blood spatter pattern better, and help bring the identity of the criminal into light.

 

When a violent crime happens, forensic scientists need to deduce the causal criminal event from the evidence. To stand the test in a court of law, the inverse calculation requires rigorous experimentation and simulation. This image of a hammer impacting a bloody surface is part of a high speed video, filmed at 4000 frames-per-second. The dynamic movement and behaviour of the blood observed from the video will allow forensic scientists to understand the resulting blood spatter pattern better, and help bring the identity of the criminal into light.